Photographic Insight Into The Hypermodern Studio 2002

I was finishing up my thesis at Cornell University and taking double loads of classes in art and cognitive psychology in addition to Spanish. Note the lightsaber, Motorola v200 (Awesome for texting, but the speaker broke 3 times and I swapped out for Nokia 3660 the first camera phone in the US) and various cords and a gigantor thermal wax printer (which I still own).

Enjoy the ten-year Wayback Machine, with a surprise popup of Pete Ippel 2002…and yes all the images were shot with a Sony Mavica 640×480 px and written to a 3.5″ floppy disk.

So this is where the magic happened…lots of Mt. Dew Code Red, sleeping under my desk with a blanket and the computer fan blowing hot air on me to stay warm…then waking up to go to drawing class at 9am, grabbing a strawberry Pop-Tart on the way…

Thank you goes to all my friends and collaborators who provided wonderful support and helped me finish my Thesis “Priorities” on time.

Pete Ippel "Blue Room" Studio - The birthplace of Hypermodern Art, Cornell University

Pete Ippel "Blue Room" Studio - The birthplace of Hypermodern Art, Cornell University

2 Lightsabers, Lappy, CAT5 cable, Motorola v200, and a Spanish Book...Typical

2 Lightsabers, Lappy, CAT5 cable, and a Spanish Book...Typical Studio Equipent

Pete Ippel in "Blue Room" studio 2002, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Pete Ippel in "Blue Room" studio 2002, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Tectronix 300i Thermal Wax Printer, Macintosh, 2 servers, and a IBM Pentium 95

Tectronix 300i Thermal Wax Printer, Macintosh, 2 servers, and a IBM Pentium 95, and the first computer I ever owned: the Compaq 1535 DM

2002, running Windows 98, this was right before I first installed Redhat Linux...

2002, running Windows 98, this was right before I first installed Redhat Linux...

I’m Taking The Question Marks In My Life And Bending Them Into Exclamation Points. I Am The Human Interrobang. Pete Ippel #ALLRISK

Pete Ippel ALL RISK Avatar

"I'm taking the question marks in my life and bending them into exclamation points. I am the human interrobang." Pete Ippel #ALLRISK ‽


"I'm taking the question marks in my life and bending them into exclamation points. I am the human interrobang." Pete Ippel #ALLRISK

Learn more about Martin K. Speckter, innovator of punctuation.

Thank you to @rejon for Fabricatorz @pianoBrad for wonderful avatar creation video tutorial unleashing the power of Inkscape to create and share. Download inkscape. Thank you to @n8willis @christopheradam @davelab6 for revealing the awesome and useful interrobang, News Cycle, and your vast font knowledge. Also gratitude goes out to @WebChickBot and Point.B Studio for supporting and sharing ALLRISK in the Artists In The Information Age Exhibition.

SHARISM is a Mind Revolution: The more you share, the more you receive. It is a ideology which promotes the sharing culture and economy as a way of thinking.

When You’ve Seen Yourself Dead, It Changes You.


Make-up 2008 – Saskia Edens

Pete Ippel Silver Skeleton

I was sitting on the #3 bus on the way to the Starlight Room sitting in the middle of the back row of seats, when we made the stop by Japan Town, and a French tour group was chatting and then they got near the back door of the bus, took one look at me, and sat in the Handicap seats up front.


Silver Skeleton 2007 – Pete Ippel

Conceptual Art Is Misunderstod.

Those that support conceptual art (performance art, video art, social sculpture, happenings etc.) art are mocked by those that do not understand it…and the myth of disbelief, shock, and awe is perpetuated by popular media.

Mimicry is common BECAUSE there is a long history of conceptual art, even when it’s lost.

Shovel by bsabarnowl http://www.flickr.com/photos/bsabarnowl/

Shovel by bsabarnowl http://www.flickr.com/photos/bsabarnowl/

The concepts surrounding this type of art are not new…specifically Praxis’ work MONA: Museum of Non-Visible Art is based on its predecessors. They generated support for their museum in a contemporary way through Kickstarter with the video below:


Even the name Praxis is a lifted reference.

The history of conceptual art that James Franco tries to explain (the fellow on the Jimmy Kimmel Show) has strong roots in the Bay Area, as does video art. That’s why I chose to study for my MFA in New Genres at the San Francisco Art Institute. The Bay Area boasts artists: Tony Labat, Linda Montano, Doug Hall (AntFarm), Sharon Grace, Paul Kos, David Ireland, Karen Finley, and many, many more.

The Museum of Conceptual Art was created by one of my mentors, Tom Marioni. Tom is a big fan of Marcel Duchamp and the Readymade. Hypermodern.net represents 12 years of conceptual art education and I’m constantly asked, what for?

Simply, as Cathy Malchiodi writes, the massively important restoring power of imagination.

The phrases “art heals” and “art saves” have become ubiquitous and will continue to circulate; like many catch-phrases, they are just too cool to go away. Like any popular slogans, they blur real meaning; in this case the actual purpose of art is often forgotten.

Cathy summarizes further synthesizes and interprets Ellen Dissanayake’s book What is Art For?

1) Makes life special.
2) Engages the senses.
3) Involves rituals.
4) Enhances community.

When was the last time you went to an art show and got an experience, a prize, a few bucks, and a great story and thought differently about the present moment you just experienced. Free Memory. Free Money. Free Ideas…and a 2 minute smile free from economic stress. Or was it referencing the financial collapse, throwing money in a hole, and making peons work for it doing crazy tasks that don’t mean anything by diverting their own lust for financial gain? Why did they follow the rules of the over arching system? The title of the piece of mine is “Free Money, Sticky Fingers” made at SomArts. Check out their open call for more art in the hole.

Sound like art?
Yes.

Sound like MTV’s Jackass?
Yes.

Sound like conceptual art?
Yes.

Is everything art?
No.

Is everyone an artist?
No.

That’s why I can auction a crispy 100 bill and get $115.00 for it and be present in hundreds of people’s minds.

Thank you R. Mutt

When critiquing or defending artwork remember three core concepts: intent (what did the artist want to express), context (where, when, and who are they showing it to), and liability (will it put the artist or anyone else in danger, will it cost money from the artist or public, does it exclude anyone, does the artist take responsibility for the piece).

It all matters. Or maybe the medium is the message, or maybe the medium is the massage.