Photographic Insight Into The Hypermodern Studio 2002

I was finishing up my thesis at Cornell University and taking double loads of classes in art and cognitive psychology in addition to Spanish. Note the lightsaber, Motorola v200 (Awesome for texting, but the speaker broke 3 times and I swapped out for Nokia 3660 the first camera phone in the US) and various cords and a gigantor thermal wax printer (which I still own).

Enjoy the ten-year Wayback Machine, with a surprise popup of Pete Ippel 2002…and yes all the images were shot with a Sony Mavica 640×480 px and written to a 3.5″ floppy disk.

So this is where the magic happened…lots of Mt. Dew Code Red, sleeping under my desk with a blanket and the computer fan blowing hot air on me to stay warm…then waking up to go to drawing class at 9am, grabbing a strawberry Pop-Tart on the way…

Thank you goes to all my friends and collaborators who provided wonderful support and helped me finish my Thesis “Priorities” on time.

Pete Ippel "Blue Room" Studio - The birthplace of Hypermodern Art, Cornell University

Pete Ippel "Blue Room" Studio - The birthplace of Hypermodern Art, Cornell University

2 Lightsabers, Lappy, CAT5 cable, Motorola v200, and a Spanish Book...Typical

2 Lightsabers, Lappy, CAT5 cable, and a Spanish Book...Typical Studio Equipent

Pete Ippel in "Blue Room" studio 2002, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Pete Ippel in "Blue Room" studio 2002, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Tectronix 300i Thermal Wax Printer, Macintosh, 2 servers, and a IBM Pentium 95

Tectronix 300i Thermal Wax Printer, Macintosh, 2 servers, and a IBM Pentium 95, and the first computer I ever owned: the Compaq 1535 DM

2002, running Windows 98, this was right before I first installed Redhat Linux...

2002, running Windows 98, this was right before I first installed Redhat Linux...

How To Become Clutter Free

How To Become Clutter Free

“Being patient, forgiving, and methodical set me free.”

How I did it: I visualized what I wanted my ideal space to be like.  I started sharing my goal with others.  I gave away or sold things that I found distracting.   

Lessons & tips: Take the risk to give / sell the things that take your attention away from what your goals are.   

Resources: Charitable causes will take any belongings you may not want or need.  It’s satisfying to think that someone else may get use out of what one doesn’t need.

It took me 3 years.

It made me Focus.

An Open Letter To Studio Visitors From Pete Ippel

Welcome to my studio.

For more than ten years I have explored and combined traditional art materials with digital techniques demonstrating creative fluency. By moving with ease and grace through a variety of media, I focus on communicating ideas and I gain knowledge in the process.

I work intuitively and iteratively when creating art and often apply scientific methodology to my art practice with the rigor of a seasoned athlete.

By observing human behavior, asking generative questions, and analyzing information, I experience daily how a disciplined process leads to comprehension of complex data and ideas. I use my artistic sensibility to present my findings in unique and compelling ways.

I appreciate the interdisciplinary nature of the artist’s life. I aspire to travel, to teach, and to create while extending my exhibition record. Being nourished creatively while partaking in a challenging path is a delight, and I particularly relish learning along the way.

Art is the most practical, essential, and exciting field of work in the world today, and I look forward to sharing it with you. Take a card, check out my website, buy a piece. I guarantee that you will have never seen anything like my art before.

All my best,

Pete Ippel
http://hypermodern.net

Hans Hofmann on Subject Matter

Each artist has a way of working…here’s Hans Hofmann’s

Every subject matter depends on how to use meaning. You can use it in a lyrical or dramatic manner. It depends on the personality of the artist. Everyone is clear about himself, as to where he belongs, and in which way he can give aesthetic enjoyment. Painting is aesthetic enjoyment. I want to be a “poet”. As an artist I must conform to my nature. My nature has a lyrical as well as a dramatic disposition. Not one day is the same. One day I feel wonderful to work and I feel an expression which shows in the work. Only with a very clear mind and on a clear day I can paint without interruptions and without food because my disposition is like that. My work should reflect my moods and the great enjoyment which I had when I did the work.

From a Xerox copy I found in my notes from Contemporary Art p. 567

Jasper Johns and Studio Practice

Inspiration from old Xerox copies I’ve been sorting through…Here’s a bit from Jasper Johns’ sketchbook from 1965.

One thing working one way
Another thing working another way.
One thing working different ways
at different times.

Take and object.
Do something to it.
Do something else to it.
” ” ” ” ”

Take a canvas.
Pt a mark on it.
Put another mark on it.
” ” ” ” ”

Make something.
Find a use for it.
AND OR
Invent a function.
Find an object.

From “Material Culture and Everyday Life” Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art : A Sourcebook of Artists’ Writings
by Kristine Stiles; Peter Howard Selz