How To Build A Rocket Pack In Five Minutes Or Fewer: John White Hosts New Art By Pete Ippel



Breaking news, one night only: “How To Build A Rocket Pack In Five Minutes Or Fewer” New art by Pete Ippel to be presented during John White’s curated 5x5x5 performance evening. The event will be hosted by Sylvia White Gallery in Ventura, California. The show begins promptly at 8pm on Friday, March 2nd 2012. Come on by for a unique contemporary art experience.


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MacGyver Helps White People Understand the Concept Of Rasquache With Positive Connotation



MacGyvero (adj.) MacGyverismo (noun) is a portmanteau coined by Pete Ippel and Peter Roberge that aids English speakers in the United States to understand the Chicano concept of Rasquache, that is both functional in American-English and sounds like Spanish.

The intent of MacGyverismo is to create positive associations among Mexican-Americans (Chicanos), original problem solving, new methods, and creative thinking.

Ask an American-English native speaker to think of someone who did the most with the least in tough situations: MacGuyver, the pop culture reference of resourcefulness, comes up consistently…often with a half-smile of nostalgia.

The starting of a car with a cactus, a nickel, and a string may be a bit of hyperbole, and MacGyver has his fair share of parody…yet the general connotation is positive.

Why is that? Because the main actor is white? Because MacGyver isn’t poor or in a marginalized culture?

There is contradiction because when performed by a non-white American, innovative repairs are castigated by pejorative words such as ghetto, hack, and jury-rigged which often have a negative connotation.

MacGyverismo is functional in explaining a complex notion to someone who only has the capacity to describe objects with the aforementioned terms. MacGyverismo imbues an odd sense of respect to an oft-dismissed practice of solving problems with available materials…a key trait of artists in any culture.

Inspired by the exhibition at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco, California entitled Chicano Visions

Introducing 11 Different, Unique, Original, Hypermodern Artists



Introducing 11 Different, Unique, Original, Hypermodern Artists: Pete Ippel

Introducing 11 Different, Unique, Original, Hypermodern Artists: Pete Ippel

Thank you to Stew Birbrower for creating the concept for this poster. Thank you to the GIMP for being rad and open source.

Check it out, I’m having an open house during Ventura Art Walk Saturday April 17th 1:00-9:00pm Sunday April 18th noon-5:00pm. Also I will be open for First Fridays Ventura, and for more info on where I live, Working Artists Ventura, check out the overview on WAV

This is a big weekend for me, and my MOM Diane Ippel is featured in the special dedication event for WAV.

The last time so many artists lived and worked in the same building was 100 years ago in Paris. That building was called La Rouche. This building is called WAV, Working Artists Ventura. Pete Ippel is one of 77 emerging artists from 21 countries with radically different styles. So the next time you want art, come to our house.

Contact Pete Ippel

175 S. Ventura Ave
Studio 213 North Building
Ventura, CA 93001

Dial 1 (234) Pete-Art to order your free educational report: 7 THINGS YOU MUST KNOW BEFORE BUYING CONTEMPORARY ART.

Free Money, Sticky Fingers



Earlier this month I participated in SOMArts Community Center’s show “MOMENTS (Bringing Back the Now)”. At the opening, Justin Hoover, the newly hired director of the gallery space, re-created the 100 Performances for the Hole that he formerly curated out of his Garage San Francisco’s Pacific Heights Neighborhood.

For 100 Performances for the Hole Take-Two, the dimensions of the hole were expanded, and moved from an automotive trench to a sand casting pit.

I issued four instructions to the group:

  • The hole is defined as the cut in the cement.
  • You may not get in the hole.
  • Any bill that lands outside of the hole must be kicked into the hole.
  • Any bills that you snatch with your sticky hand are yours, any bills left in the hole after the two minutes are mine.

Getting ready for "Free Money, Sticky Fingers" Pete Ippel, 03/06/10
“Free Money, Stick Fingers” involves the art market, memory of childhood games, issues of control, gift giving, and philanthropic aims.

A Day in San Francisco from Rossita Dove on Vimeo.

In addition, there is a cameo appearance of “Free Money, Sticky Fingers” toward the end of the short video “A Day in San Francisco” by Rossita Dove.

Check out the Photos and the press release (below) for more information about the exhibition.

100 Performances for the Hole – Take Two is the opening event (#1 of 3) of a month long exhibition called: MOMENTS (Bringing Back the Now). This show features a series of live art events that transform the gallery into a contemporary art laboratory exploring the intersection between visual mediums, performance art, and time-based sculpture.

Conceived of by SOMArts Curator and Gallery Director Justin Hoover, this exhibition examines the state of contemporary live art in the Bay Are by inviting the collaboration and participation of over 100 performance artists working in a variety of styles and methods. MOMENTS (Bringing Back The Now) is structured around three events examining performance art today: a series of 100 two-minute, site-specific performances performed one after another, a ballet with heavy machinery that was inspired by a previous performance choreographed by youth in a housing complex, and a series of time-based and mobile/ephemeral sculptures.

According to curator Justin Hoover “the lived moment is often greatly under-appreciated, in life and in the arts. Largely, in the mind of the public, fine art is relegated to objects and environments, and rarely is the emotionality and the nuance of a lived moment evidenced as an artwork. In the contemporary moment, art has long surpassed the realm of objecthood and some of the most innovative new forms reside i experience. By highlighting local performance artists and performative installations, SOMArts gives Bay Area artists and audiences a chance to exchange ideas and build attention around a developing form that rarely finds its way into a gallery. MOMENTS (Bring Back the Now) brings immediacy back to the experience of contemporary art viewership.”

Additionally, this exhibition will work in conjunction with the Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) to upload this live program directly to cable television.

100 Performances for the Hole – Take Two breathes fresh life into a formerly disused part of the SOMArts Main Gallery, namely what remains of the mechanics pit from the building’s former life as the Union Machine Company. Through a simple hole and an open call for ephemeral performance artwork, 100 Performances highlighting the contemporary timescape of today and invigorates a wide swath of the performance art community, one that is vibrant, innovative, playful, and elusive. This tour-de-force of the ephemeral is juried by Kevin B. Chen, Peter Foucault, Justin Hoover, Jackie Im, Lex Leifheit, and Lucy Kalyani Lin.

List of Art Exhibitions I’ve Attended



Selected exhibitions gleaned from old paper catalogs and ticket stubs, This is a non-exhaustive list.

2003 “Continuum 12 artists” (including Kay WalkingStick from Cornell) Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, NYC
21 October 2004-30 January 2005 Focus “Now I see” Anri Sala Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Illinois
Great Indoors Robert & Shana ParkeHarrison Photogravures Jan 17-march 7th 2004 (I really liked their work) Walter and McBean Galleries SFAI, San Francisco, CA
German Art and the Past, Postwar German Works on Paper, 2002 Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Illinois
Gerhard Richter forty years of painting 2002 Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Illinois ( I also saw the same show at SF MOMA in 2004)
Stir Heart, Rinse HeartPipilotti Rist 2004, SF MOMA
Numbers by Kristin Oppenheim 2002, SF MOMA
2003 Arnold Odermatt selected photographs 1939-1993, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Illinois
2003 Juan Munoz Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Illinois
2002 Vangogh and Gauguin, The Studio of the South Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Illinois
2002 Postwar German Works on Paper Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Illinois

Press Release: “The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming and Other Conundrums” An art show by Pete Ippel



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming and Other Conundrums” An art show by Pete Ippel
May 16-31, 2008
Opening Reception: Friday, May 16, 6-9 p.m. with DJ music and indoor-jumping photo souvenirs for guests. EDITORS: You, your reporters and photographers are welcome to cover the event.

Icthus Gallery
1769 15th Street (between Valencia and Guerrero), San Francisco, CA
Gallery hours, weekdays, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; weekends, by appointment
Admission, Free


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For more information, contact, Pete Ippel, artist
Phone, (415) 425-8863
E-mail, pete at hypermodern.net
Web site, http://www.hypermodern.net/archives/fsgw/
The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming
“The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming”, 40 x 60 inches (101 x 152 cm), gouache, ink, pencil, and watercolor on paper

SAN FRANCISCO, Monday, April 28, 2008 – The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming and other Conundrums is an exhibition of new artwork by San Francisco based artist and athlete Pete Ippel. In this collection of drawings, photographic prints, and videos he explores themes ranging from nuclear waste processing to the pairing of art and sport.

In Ippel’s brightly rendered, fantastical 2-D world, a box of lightning, some incandescent light bulbs, and a gigantic, biological-organic turbine are coupled with wind, tide, hydroelectric, nuclear, volcanic, solar, and geothermal power sources to sequester carbon dioxide. Under intense heat and pressure, in a star-powered fusion-cooker, diamonds are produced, thus solving the dilemmas of green house gases, vacant mines, and human rights issues associated with diamond mining.

The exhibition also highlights artifacts, photographic prints, and video informed by Ippel’s work as an athlete and a coach. After completing a successful collegiate track and field career as a high jumper in New York, Ippel made the move to San Francisco to pursue a Masters of Fine Art in the New Genres Department of the San Francisco Art institute.

It was here in the Bay Area, inspired by local artists Tony Labat and Tom Marioni, where Ippel began to craft projects that married his passion for jumping to his artistic practice.

“When I saw that Tony had devoted a year of his life to boxing, and Tom was drinking beer with friends in the name of art while making movement based drawing and prints I felt empowered,” said Ippel. “And I’ve been fortunate to spend time with both of them here in San Francisco. I really respect their work,” Ippel added.

“The Jump Series” grows out of the tradition of New Genres where actions are performed for the camera. The body of work is based on the premise that to push of one’s self off any surface and into the air by using the muscles in one’s legs and feet is a glorious and enjoyable act; essentially human flight. The modes of lift-off on display include skateboarding, high jumping, jumping off of architecture, leaping into panoramic scenes, jumping over objects, and choreographed jumps with other individuals. Ippel utilizes a tripod and a remote control or the camera’s self-timer to execute this body of performative photographs.

TSP Athletics, also on display, is a competitive vertical jumps team, social club, and acts as a collaborative vehicle to generate images of athletes in flight. It blurs boundaries between art and sport while acting as a vehicle to temper the shock of moving away from traditional competitive athletics.

“When you have something obscure like the high jump that has been your top priority for so many years, it’s foreign when it’s gone,” says Ippel. “Because I went directly to SFAI from Cornell, it was quite a challenge to no longer have the support of my team, nor be able to celebrate my athletic gifts in competition. I went through a real period of grief.” Ippel satiated his needs by creating a one-person team and traveling alone to meets a few times a year. “I made a uniform, started a website, and I kept in touch with my jumping peers. When I was at the meets after being away for so long, I started to see the beauty of the action and the camaraderie and wanted to capture it, and still keep it active in my life.”

The project has developed as an answer to what collegiate athletes do upon graduation to keep in touch, keep jumping, and make art.

Since its inception in 2004, TSP Athletics has grown to include former NCAA qualifiers and university record holders. Ippel’s plan is to produce limited-edition prints with participation by distinguished jumpers who are invited to be athletes-in-residence for TSP. In the frame of social sculpture these artists/athletes will each, contribute to the TSP Archive to add to its expanding collection of images and memorabilia.

ARTIST BIOGRAPHY
Pete Ippel was born in Oak Park, Illinois, USA and has been surrounded by the arts since birth. He moved to Morris, Illinois in 1989 and started to participate in athletics rather than dance. After high school, Pete attended Cornell University where he earned a BA in psychology and a BFA in photo / digital art making. He continued to follow his sporting dreams in the high jump, which culminated in a school record leap of 7 feet 1/2 inch in 2001. In May 2004 he attained an MFA degree in the New Genres department of the San Francisco Art Institute. Presently Pete is a practicing artist whose work is in numerous private collections. He’s also the residence manager for the San Francisco Ballet, a fitness professional, coaches basketball and track at University High School, and still high jumps from time to time.

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