When You’ve Seen Yourself Dead, It Changes You.




Make-up 2008 – Saskia Edens

Pete Ippel Silver Skeleton

I was sitting on the #3 bus on the way to the Starlight Room sitting in the middle of the back row of seats, when we made the stop by Japan Town, and a French tour group was chatting and then they got near the back door of the bus, took one look at me, and sat in the Handicap seats up front.


Silver Skeleton 2007 – Pete Ippel

Peace Comes With Acknowledgement Of One’s Own Mortality.



It’s about knowing that life is finite, as is energy in any given form or shape. Energy flows out and in, to and from any vessel, and energy cannot be destroyed.

ROMA O MORTE (Rome or Death): Rome, Italy 2003 by Pete Ippel

ROMA O MORTE (Rome or Death): Rome, Italy 2003 by Pete Ippel


It’s the longing and the emptiness that allows for the kinetic and dynamic to enter. Harmony is false, because it denies flow. Being full is false, because it denies longing.

Openness allows for boundaries to exist, just as boundaries allow for openness…Thereby creating a vessel for energy. If there are no boundaries, there can be no peace nor present.

ALLRISK
?

Worth and Debt = Birth and Death



I mis-heard the right and heard the left when talking with a close mentor about finance. When you suffer from aphasia this is your life, or maybe it’s a natural metaphor. Perception and context matter.

Inspiring Installation by Pete Ippel Created for the Museum of Ventura County Dia de los Muertos Community Celebration



VENTURA, CA – October 26th, 2010 – November 5th, 2010 – Pete Ippel, known for his conceptual installation pieces, has created a specialized artwork for the annual community observance of the Day of the Dead.

Pete Ippel Dia de los Muertos Altar made of re-used plastic bags - The Museum of Ventura County

Delicate and Imposing Dia de los Muertos Altar made of re-used plastic bags created by Pete Ippel. Installation at The Museum of Ventura County.

In Ippel’s Dia de los Muertos altar he has explored the properties of polyethylene thermoplastic made from petroleum. The annual production of this material according to a 2008 study by Piringer & Baner is approximately 80 million metric tons worldwide.

The 11 foot tall stitched work will move with air currents when the cascading waterfall of bones and spirits rustles as viewers walk through the gallery. The piece’s monumental scale contrasts with its near-weightless materials. By integrating reused plastic bags into the installation, Pete Ippel gives items headed to the landfill, or into the ocean, an afterlife.

In addition the re-purposing of discarded plastic bags raises awareness about the Great North Pacific garbage patch. – Where the volume of photo-degraded plastic particulate is grater than the number of plankton.

There’s trash heap the size of Texas, in the ocean, made of plastic.

When you leave the house, please remember to bring your own tote-bags.

Pete Ippel is an artist and record setting high jumper who employs an iterative process honed by experience in research, athletics, and art to present complex ideas in compelling ways. Mr. Ippel’s art is in numerous private collections and has been exhibited in New York, California, and internationally.

You can see Pete’s art on line at http://peteippel.com, http://hypermodern.net or email pete@hypermodern.net for additional information.

Open Fashion T-Shirt Design for The Museum of Ventura County’s Day of the Dead Celebration



For the past few months, I’ve been working closely with the Museum of Ventura County to create a design for their Dia de Los Muertos event.

Museum Of Ventura County Dia De Los Muertos T-Shirt By Pete Ippel
In this wearable art, I have taken the traditional imagery of the calaca (Mexican skeleton) and given it a contemporary flavor. The interactive garment allows the wearer to take their celebration of El Dia De Los Muertos in a new direction.

Once the shirt has served it’s purpose as clothing, the wearer is encouraged to cut out the printed image and create a decoration for their own altar by simply attaching the arms and legs to the torso.

My design is intentionally open, so that the new collaborator can add their own decorations, flowers, or write directly on the printed cloth. By working together, we both realize our creative vision, celebrating the spirit of our ancestors and loved ones. Truly a move toward Open Fashion.