The Act Of Seeking Is Important: Artists, Whales, and a Sea Sponge



Look at the difference between a baleen whale vs. a sea sponge. Both can commonly be understood as “filter feeders”. However the difference between the two is active vs. passive filtering.

Repository: Fiske Icelandic Collection, Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library

Búðir (Snæfellsnes- og Hnappadalssýsla, Iceland : Farmstead)

When I say artists make decisions, they are whales, actively seeking nourishing content following instincts, and making decisions through experience and technique.

Artists and whales sift and process…having the sense and experience to follow others, to collaborate when appropriate, to capture sustenance together. Other times they seek a solo journey of thousands of miles…alone.

The pod, the nurturing behavior, and the desire to migrate are not mutually exclusive.

Meanwhile the sea sponge just spends the day eating what passes by in a static community. It is rooted to a rock and passively consumes anything that floats through. It is forced to accept what it is provided.

Active vs. passive: interactive vs. transmissive : hypertext vs. broadcast: The act of seeking is important.

…and artists are still Apex-Apex Predators culling their own ideas.

Pete Ippel Studio Thank You



This thank you goes out to everyone who sent me a message, gave me a thumbs up, shared their energy, drove me to the hospital, smiled, laughed, held me when I cried, cut my skull open, taught my class, wiped my ass, showered me, fed me, stuck needles in me, listened to my story attentively, put screws in my head, broke my nose, sucked out snot and puss with a vacuum, scraped infected bone out of my sinus, put cream on my bed sores, stacked pillows under my back, rubbed my feet, cleaned up my puke, gave me motor tests, PT, OT, Cog T, Psy T,and dealt with me freaking out in the MRI…I love you all, and I’m going to keep surprising everyone…even myself.

Pete Ippel Studio Thank You from Hypermodern – Pete Ippel on Vimeo.

And here’s the text from the video

I have a big enough studio to walk around like this.

I have a big enough studio to jump like this.

I have a crazy enough hairdo to make my sideburns laugh.

I have enough room to SPIN!

I have enough room to walk and talk and think and be PETE again.

There’s nothing that’s going to stop me from succeeding.

I’m going to be fluent and I’m going to be beautiful and I’m going to be successful.

…and be an an artist, and be an athlete, and be a lover, and a dad, and a friend…everything I ever wanted.

And I’m going to do it because of people like you.

So thank you for your help. I really appreciate it.

I love you.

ALL RISK.

“If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”
-Martin Luther King

Free And Open Culture Mind Map



My passion: to empower some free-culture advocating, network-neutrality loving, FLOSS using, empathy having, critical thinking art students. Today we did a bit of brainstorming about what influences/passions can guide us as a group toward a collaborative project.

Keeping in mind the concepts of free and open culture, between now and the next session each individual will be color coding inter-student connections, rather than focusing internally.

Keep an eye on the Mindmeister mind map below to watch our project develop. You’ll probably have the best user experience if you click on the little box at the bottom of the interface controls to open the mind map in a new window.

Making History: Free And Open Culture



Basic black & white cartoon computer. Image contains computer monitor and base/case.

You can create art and beauty on a computer.

FREE AND OPEN CULTURE

Making and Meaning – Making History Project
San Francisco Art Institute, Fall, 2010
Workshop Leader: Pete Ippel

Summary: Free and Open Culture refers to a wide variety of advocates who value free access, open information, and the sharing of knowledge. As a rapidly developing movement, Free and Open Culture has its roots in computer programming and hacker ethic from the 1950s-1960s.

Illustrates the path of software creation from source code to machine code.

Illustrates the path of software creation from source code to machine code.


Developments include Creative Commons licensing, FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software), Network Neutrality, Open Government, and Copyleft.

Free Culture proponents are marked by acceptance of some general principles: (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hacker_ethic#The_hacker_ethics)

  • Sharing
  • Openness
  • Decentralization
  • Free access to computers
  • World Improvement

Cultural Figures: Linus Torvalds (programmer, Linux), Richard Stallman (programmer, GNU), Lawrence Lessig (academic, Creative Commons), Jon Phillips (developer, Sharism, Fabricatorz), Femke Snelting (artist/designer, LGM), Simona Lodi (arts administrator, To Share Festival), Nina Paley (animator, Sita Sings The Blues), Negativeland (music), Ant Farm (art), Adbusters (magazine), The Yes Men (art)

Project:  Students will spend the first sessions studying the history and techniques of the Free and Open Culture advocates and artists. There will be tutorials on a variety of software, as well as an off campus outing to practice employing the Hands-On Imperative.

“…essential lessons can be learned about the systems—about the world—from taking things apart, seeing how they work, and using this knowledge to create new and more interesting things.”
– Steven Levy

Students will pursue the following questions:

In the remaining sessions, students will be challenged to create with only the materials they have on hand – please bring an open mind and your own PORTABLE creation tools of choice to each session (mobile phone, laptop, sketchbook, notebook, watercolor, pencils, video camera, still camera, etc.).

We will be developing a collaborative community-centric studio (less) art practice out in the environment. The group will create their own art pieces in any media with strong consideration of Free and Open Culture. The end result will be an on-line repository (Mediawiki) documenting the projects. It is expected that the participants in this class will license their work under Creative Commons, and investigate the following issues:

  • I create everywhere because I have the network in my pocket.
  • If it’s not on the Internet, it doesn’t exist.
  • Objects are not important, information is.
  • I don’t need to know it if I know how to find it.
  • Online, nothing disappears, and everything is gone.
  • I feed the network, it feeds me.

The Grit and The Grind: Exploring The Artistic Hustle, Commonalities, and Myth



This workshop will explore commonalities among The Bay Area’s innovative, musicians, poets, entrepreneurs, artists, and politicians. Starting with hip-hop as a visible, accessible entry point to the grand metaphor of a creative career path we will canvass our community for inspirational stories, myths, fictions, half-truths, lies, facts, and constructions.

Recycled Aluminum Foil Grill by Pete Ippel

Pete Ippel is Green and Hyphy


After discussion and research the workshop will focus on answering the following questions by creating projects based on:

  • What is my personal creation story?
  • What makes me better/different than the next artist? 
  • What challenges have I overcome to follow my dream?
  • How does my lifestyle affect my art, or are they unified? 
  • How do I get more attention to my art?

By creating persona and personal legends on-line and in the street, we will be exploring how social media (blogs, facebook, twitter, foursquare) can both become a distraction from your art and an attraction to your art. We will even approach social media AS your art.

Please bring an open mind and your own PORTABLE creation tools of choice to each session (mobile phone, laptop, sketchbook, notebook, watercolor, pencils, video camera, still camera, etc.). The take away is learning how you can use the power of presentation to influence viewers, community, and media outlets.

The Seven Things You Must Know Before Purchasing Contemporary Art



The Absence by Pete Ippel

The Absence by Pete Ippel

When you learn how to best answer these questions, you are ready to buy some art. Get educated, enjoy life, support artists.

  • What am I looking at?
  • What is my budget?
  • Can I make it myself?
  • Why do I like it?
  • Is it an investment?
  • Can I store it?
  • Will it degrade?

Contact Pete Ippel to get more information on purchasing contemporary art. Find out what else is going in in the Pete Ippel Studio, check out the event calendar.

Disciplined Artists Never Say “I’m bored.”



In this workshop you will learn that artistic growth comes out of actions.

Wiring your mind for artistic success through iteration, intuition, and discipline will allow you to step away from a fear based artistic life. You will learn to turn off the internal sensor by attacking the boundaries you have placed on yourself and will never again say, “I should be making art right now”.

By sharing generative experiences we will be pushing through fear, creating art in the process.

In addition to the indoor studio component, we will be going on a “Think Walk” – making the world our studio – so wear comfortable clothing and walking shoes. Please bring an open mind and your own PORTABLE creation tools of choice to each session. (mobile phone, laptop, sketchbook, notebook, watercolor, pencils, video camera, still camera, etc.)

The take away is documentation of your work, and a new way of approaching creation.