Press Release: “The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming and Other Conundrums” An art show by Pete Ippel

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming and Other Conundrums” An art show by Pete Ippel
May 16-31, 2008
Opening Reception: Friday, May 16, 6-9 p.m. with DJ music and indoor-jumping photo souvenirs for guests. EDITORS: You, your reporters and photographers are welcome to cover the event.

Icthus Gallery
1769 15th Street (between Valencia and Guerrero), San Francisco, CA
Gallery hours, weekdays, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; weekends, by appointment
Admission, Free


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For more information, contact, Pete Ippel, artist
Phone, (415) 425-8863
E-mail, pete at hypermodern.net
Web site, http://www.hypermodern.net/archives/fsgw/
The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming
“The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming”, 40 x 60 inches (101 x 152 cm), gouache, ink, pencil, and watercolor on paper

SAN FRANCISCO, Monday, April 28, 2008 – The Fantastic Solution to Global Warming and other Conundrums is an exhibition of new artwork by San Francisco based artist and athlete Pete Ippel. In this collection of drawings, photographic prints, and videos he explores themes ranging from nuclear waste processing to the pairing of art and sport.

In Ippel’s brightly rendered, fantastical 2-D world, a box of lightning, some incandescent light bulbs, and a gigantic, biological-organic turbine are coupled with wind, tide, hydroelectric, nuclear, volcanic, solar, and geothermal power sources to sequester carbon dioxide. Under intense heat and pressure, in a star-powered fusion-cooker, diamonds are produced, thus solving the dilemmas of green house gases, vacant mines, and human rights issues associated with diamond mining.

The exhibition also highlights artifacts, photographic prints, and video informed by Ippel’s work as an athlete and a coach. After completing a successful collegiate track and field career as a high jumper in New York, Ippel made the move to San Francisco to pursue a Masters of Fine Art in the New Genres Department of the San Francisco Art institute.

It was here in the Bay Area, inspired by local artists Tony Labat and Tom Marioni, where Ippel began to craft projects that married his passion for jumping to his artistic practice.

“When I saw that Tony had devoted a year of his life to boxing, and Tom was drinking beer with friends in the name of art while making movement based drawing and prints I felt empowered,” said Ippel. “And I’ve been fortunate to spend time with both of them here in San Francisco. I really respect their work,” Ippel added.

“The Jump Series” grows out of the tradition of New Genres where actions are performed for the camera. The body of work is based on the premise that to push of one’s self off any surface and into the air by using the muscles in one’s legs and feet is a glorious and enjoyable act; essentially human flight. The modes of lift-off on display include skateboarding, high jumping, jumping off of architecture, leaping into panoramic scenes, jumping over objects, and choreographed jumps with other individuals. Ippel utilizes a tripod and a remote control or the camera’s self-timer to execute this body of performative photographs.

TSP Athletics, also on display, is a competitive vertical jumps team, social club, and acts as a collaborative vehicle to generate images of athletes in flight. It blurs boundaries between art and sport while acting as a vehicle to temper the shock of moving away from traditional competitive athletics.

“When you have something obscure like the high jump that has been your top priority for so many years, it’s foreign when it’s gone,” says Ippel. “Because I went directly to SFAI from Cornell, it was quite a challenge to no longer have the support of my team, nor be able to celebrate my athletic gifts in competition. I went through a real period of grief.” Ippel satiated his needs by creating a one-person team and traveling alone to meets a few times a year. “I made a uniform, started a website, and I kept in touch with my jumping peers. When I was at the meets after being away for so long, I started to see the beauty of the action and the camaraderie and wanted to capture it, and still keep it active in my life.”

The project has developed as an answer to what collegiate athletes do upon graduation to keep in touch, keep jumping, and make art.

Since its inception in 2004, TSP Athletics has grown to include former NCAA qualifiers and university record holders. Ippel’s plan is to produce limited-edition prints with participation by distinguished jumpers who are invited to be athletes-in-residence for TSP. In the frame of social sculpture these artists/athletes will each, contribute to the TSP Archive to add to its expanding collection of images and memorabilia.

ARTIST BIOGRAPHY
Pete Ippel was born in Oak Park, Illinois, USA and has been surrounded by the arts since birth. He moved to Morris, Illinois in 1989 and started to participate in athletics rather than dance. After high school, Pete attended Cornell University where he earned a BA in psychology and a BFA in photo / digital art making. He continued to follow his sporting dreams in the high jump, which culminated in a school record leap of 7 feet 1/2 inch in 2001. In May 2004 he attained an MFA degree in the New Genres department of the San Francisco Art Institute. Presently Pete is a practicing artist whose work is in numerous private collections. He’s also the residence manager for the San Francisco Ballet, a fitness professional, coaches basketball and track at University High School, and still high jumps from time to time.

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Sonoma for Wine-Country Photo Shoot

This weekend was a memorable one, not only did I meet to help decide the future of SFAI, but I went to Sonoma county and learned how whine is made. I documented it with 35mm film, as well as my own memory. I really like the way the country looks up that way. Such a different feel than to here. I got to see some leaves change, and had a fire for the first time in a long time.

Thanks to Eric, Page, Paul and Kevin for a wonderful trip.

It’s My Favorite Holiday and No Art History

Happy Halloween everyone…I’m headed to Castro, but I still need a costume.

Lots happened today, I had the grad council meeting and I don’t have to re-take art history, they changed the requirements and I’m getting “grandfathered” in. I should I had 20 credits of art hist. and they thought I was not qualified.

I am going to be applying to the Jacob J. Javits fellowship again this year, I want to winnnnnnnnnnnnn! I may be going to Santa Rosa this weekend to shoot a winery. That should be fun. So much is going on, but I still need a job.

Notes from Matmos Lecture 2002

Mary Douglas book —> Dirt

*It’s all about the venue/gallery/rave/etc. if you’re comfortable.

Chris Watson—->Caberet Voltaire from the 70’s
Touch label
Protools, cubase *logic* Max

(chaotic chemistry)

Pierre Henry “death”
1963 Variations for a door and a sign
Music Concrete
Music out of Anerexia 1 or 2 sources
“We liked raves before they became full of suburban drug addicts”

Francisco Lopez – blindfolded audience
Limitations of technology make things seem like a better idea.

cut/pitch shift
Backwards/forwards
It’s about source
Clip, glitch
peak
Look to get out of rhythm more

Dada smitrerland teens
Next synths
Roland sampler

Toured with Bjork

Make one song out of an object (Neil Diamond, not a musician, an entertainer)

Copyright law —> no such words as “new”
Be inspiring and make free things

Negative land —> Folk music of now. Music is far more efficient the new “word of mouth”

It’s not about the world it’s about me. Future physical in London

Gah, Another Tough Friday Lecture

Well, another Friday lecture down the tubes, I wonder if it’s a prerequisite to be an awful speaker if you’re being a visiting lecture. Tonight she was yawning to her own slides, AND THEY’RE HER SLIDES! It’s a damn good thing I’m becoming an artist, because I want to create change when I come back to SFAI, people will have fun, and the lecture is going to be SHORT, because I don’t want to waste grad student’s time.

In other news open studios is tomorrow, and I’m stoked.

In other, other news, I want to high jump so bad I can taste it, and I finally have a goal, I want to compete in the State Games of America in CT this summer. I’ve got a long way to go, as I’m a bit soft right now.

Gotta tone down the skating too, my left hip is getting funky from skating 6 miles a day to and from the studios…skate to stay young.

Hooray for Well-Spoken Artists

So I went to San Francisco Art Institute (from this point on SFAI) to see ANYA GALLACCIO talk. Finally something that didn’t suck. The last few speakers I’ve seen makes me wonder what I’m paying for and question why I didn’t stay home to pick the toe jam from under my nails. I have to say that she was at least a dynamic speaker. Her art…well, I’d say one thing, I’m not so much an art criticbut more of an art Cynic. Bottom line is, I have respect for her presence and her persona. That’s what’s selling her work (and most artists for that matter) dispite what she says about wanting to have an attachment to her viewer and place. She was from London at the right time, and rode the same conceptual train as Damien Hirst and the rest of those folks on the other side of the pond. I want to get that gig, having larger than life “art status” and work that is enjoyable. I just want to break even, set my own schedule, and be present for my kids and wife when I have ’em. That’s what art is about for me, “artrockstardom” (a term I coined at my last year at Cornell University. Living it is doing it, and doing it now.